The Oklahoma Observer

The Oklahoma Observer The Oklahoma Observer is the state's leading source for progressive news and commentary. Our mission: To comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Visit our website: https://okobserver.org
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There are many hard choices ahead, but there’s really only one solution that will extend life on planet earth. Until and...
05/08/2020
Let's All Pull Together | The Oklahoma Observer

There are many hard choices ahead, but there’s really only one solution that will extend life on planet earth. Until and unless we all pull together in the same direction, there will be no future worth living. See Bob D. Rounsavell's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/lets-all-pull-together/

BY BOB D. ROUNSAVELL This title has more than one application. Our planet is currently threatened by two heinous man-made problems, both with the potential of wiping out life on earth, including us humans. The first – climate change – is brought on primarily by persons who have chosen to get wea...

Why are Oklahoma lawmakers making it more difficult for you to vote during the pandemic – when they made it easier for t...
05/08/2020
Hamilton: Why legislators are making it more difficult to vote

Why are Oklahoma lawmakers making it more difficult for you to vote during the pandemic – when they made it easier for themselves to vote by proxy during this legislative session? See Observer Editor Arnold Hamilton's latest The Journal Record column:

https://bit.ly/2SO5eB7

What’s most important to Oklahoma’s legislative leaders? Preserving political power.

Freedom and free enterprise are both more secure with a strong social safety net. See Sharon Martin's latest essay:https...
05/06/2020
Our Money, Our Services | The Oklahoma Observer

Freedom and free enterprise are both more secure with a strong social safety net. See Sharon Martin's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/our-money-our-services/

Privatization is capitalism’s end goal, a plan that funnels all taxes into private enterprise and publicly traded companies. That includes essential services – education, health care, and the infrastructure on which we all rely. In the last couple of decades, not only are taxpayers paying execut...

The propagandists want to discredit the CDC and Dr. Anthony Fauci, hoping you'll believe the very dangerous and deadly l...
05/05/2020
Wearing Masks: The Tale Of Two COVID-19 Graphics | The Oklahoma Observer

The propagandists want to discredit the CDC and Dr. Anthony Fauci, hoping you'll believe the very dangerous and deadly lie that our response to COVID-19 has been a “success story." See Mark Y.A. Davies' latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/wearing-masks-the-tale-of-two-covid-19-graphics/

Propaganda 101 – Here is a little lesson about propaganda that can be seen in what I will call “The Tale of Two COVID19 Graphics.” Let’s say you are starting out with the goal of wanting to convince people that the CDC and people like Dr. Anthony Fauci are lying to us about how bad COVID19 i...

The Oklahoma Legislature’s No. 1 job – crafting the annual state budget – is typically the stuff of palace intrigue: A s...
05/05/2020
Observercast Episode 13: A Priority Of Compassion And Service | The Oklahoma Observer

The Oklahoma Legislature’s No. 1 job – crafting the annual state budget – is typically the stuff of palace intrigue: A small group of elected insiders gathers in secret, choosing fiscal winners and losers … which are then not revealed until the final hectic hours before the session’s constitutionally-mandated, end-of-May sine die.

This year, there was more drama than usual, as the COVID-19 pandemic paralyzed the world economy, sub-zero oil prices battered state revenue forecasts, and Gov. Kevin Stitt became so estranged from lawmakers that he had virtually no say in shaping the FY 2021 budget.

The frostiness between the Capitol’s fourth floor – home of legislative leaders – and second floor – where the governor is ensconced in his corner office – was riveting theater, to be sure. But to focus on those things misses a more point: State budgets, you see, aren’t just about political power, green eyeshades and bean counting.

They are moral documents, impacting real people, often in ways we rarely pause to consider.

This week, in Observercast Episode 13: A Priority Of Compassion And Service, we take a deep dive into what our state budget says about us, as Oklahomans, and about our priorities with the Rev. Shannon Fleck, executive director of the Oklahoma Conference of Churches.

https://okobserver.org/observercast-episode-13-a-priority-of-compassion-and-service/

The Oklahoma Legislature’s No. 1 job – crafting the annual state budget – is typically the stuff of palace intrigue: A small group of elected insiders gathers in secret, choosing fiscal winners and losers … which are then not revealed until the final hectic hours before the session’s const...

Admittedly, states all over the country are having issues processing unemployment claims. However, no other state is hav...
05/04/2020
Whether Inept Or Willful, OESC Failing Oklahomans | The Oklahoma Observer

Admittedly, states all over the country are having issues processing unemployment claims. However, no other state is having Oklahoma's level of ineptitude. See state Rep. Mickey Dollens' essay:

https://okobserver.org/whether-inept-or-willful-oesc-failing-oklahomans/

Editor’s Note: This first appeared on state Rep. Mickey Dollens’ page. We are sharing it with our readers because it s importance. BY MICKEY DOLLENS I write this post with a heavy heart. I ask that you read it in its entirety and if you find the information to be helpful or useful, plea...

Instead of emphasizing preparation, vaccines, and education in an attempt to prevent the spread of COVID-19, right-wing ...
05/03/2020
The Danger Of Sectioning Off Humanity Into 'Races” And 'Worlds' | The Oklahoma Observer

Instead of emphasizing preparation, vaccines, and education in an attempt to prevent the spread of COVID-19, right-wing governments deploy disease to fuel their morbid agendas and vilify entire communities. See Nyla Ali Khan's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/the-danger-of-sectioning-off-humanity-into-races-and-worlds/

BY NYLA ALI KHAN All of us are trying to adjust to the unforeseen changes brought about by the onset of COVID-19. The transition to the virtual world has not been a cakewalk for everyone. Several people, particularly of my parents' generation, are not technology friendly but are now having ...

It’s folly to assume fresh eyes are always preferable. Or that tenure breeds complacency. Experience is especially impor...
05/01/2020
Hamilton: Experience matters during a crisis

It’s folly to assume fresh eyes are always preferable. Or that tenure breeds complacency. Experience is especially important in times of crisis. See Observer Editor Arnold Hamilton's latest The Journal Record column:

https://bit.ly/3aVIVzV

There’s a lesson Americans, generally, and Oklahomans, specifically, seem to relearn every time there’s a crisis: Experience matters, especially when it comes to government service.

Only an ignoramus with the arrogance of Trump would dispense the medical advice he has handed out since the pandemic rea...
04/30/2020
Trumpistas Require Daily Belief Updates | The Oklahoma Observer

Only an ignoramus with the arrogance of Trump would dispense the medical advice he has handed out since the pandemic reached our shores. He has already lost [as in dead] at least one follower who believed it was all a hoax. Others maintain that preposterousness still: their leader spoke it; they must believe. See Gary Edmondson's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/trumpistas-require-daily-belief-updates/

Perhaps it is a political corollary to a philosophical dilemma. But the implications in the public arena say they should have at least equal billing. The question before the board is whether it is easier to be a Trumpista, awaiting the aptly-named tweets to know what to believe at any particular ...

https://okobserver.org/pandemic-policy/
04/28/2020
Pandemic Policy | The Oklahoma Observer

https://okobserver.org/pandemic-policy/

Pandemic Policy By Oklahoma Observer on April 28, 2020 Facebook Comments Facebook Twitter Previous articleStories Of Sanity, Compassion And Trust Amidst Communal Violence LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Oklahoma Observer Ads Commonplace Books Oklahoma Observer - July 17, 2019 0 R...

The greatest test of the success of a democracy lies in the extent to which its minorities feel secure. In this perspect...
04/28/2020
Stories Of Sanity, Compassion And Trust Amidst Communal Violence | The Oklahoma Observer

The greatest test of the success of a democracy lies in the extent to which its minorities feel secure. In this perspective, democracy and secularism in India will remain failed experiments so long as minorities are marginalized. See Nyla Ali Khan's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/stories-of-sanity-compassion-and-trust-amidst-communal-violence/

BY NYLA ALI KHAN The printed word can make a large impact on the public mind. I hope to see journalists, particularly those in mainland India, rise above personal prejudices and look at problems from a detached and independent point of view, and, thus, make their contribution to the solution of ...

Last week, Gov. Kevin Stitt took steps to begin reopening Oklahoma, confident the state can manage the coronavirus that ...
04/28/2020
Observercast Episode 12: Where Are The Voices Of Public Health? | The Oklahoma Observer

Last week, Gov. Kevin Stitt took steps to begin reopening Oklahoma, confident the state can manage the coronavirus that already has infected 3,280 Sooners and killed 197.

The governor’s plan – which includes opening restaurant dining rooms, movie theaters and gyms – immediately drew fire from health experts worried COVID-19 cases could spike, swamping hospitals still plagued by inadequate supplies of personal protective equipment.

In this week’s Observercast – Where Are The Voices Of Public Health? – we take a deep dive into the state’s response to the coronavirus pandemic with Dr. Randy Hubach, a professor at the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences.

Dr. Hubach is a leading rural health researcher whose expertise is in infectious diseases.

https://okobserver.org/where-are-the-voices-of-public-health/

Last week, Gov. Kevin Stitt took steps to begin reopening Oklahoma, confident the state can manage the coronavirus that already has infected 3,280 Sooners and killed 197. The governor’s plan – which includes opening restaurant dining rooms, movie theaters and gyms – immediately drew fire from ...

https://okobserver.org/viral-virtuoso/
04/27/2020
Viral Virtuoso | The Oklahoma Observer

https://okobserver.org/viral-virtuoso/

Viral Virtuoso By Oklahoma Observer on April 26, 2020 Facebook Comments Facebook Twitter Previous articleRespect LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Oklahoma Observer Ads Commonplace Books Oklahoma Observer - July 17, 2019 0 Read more Related Articles Cartoon Imagine That Oklahoma Ob...

"I actually do respect the office of President. And that is why I cannot respect trump." See Jim Bush's latest essay:htt...
04/25/2020
Respect | The Oklahoma Observer

"I actually do respect the office of President. And that is why I cannot respect trump." See Jim Bush's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/respect/

BY JIM BUSH Some of my trump supporter friends have chastised me for not respecting trump as President. Well, the thing is that I actually do respect the office of President. And that is why I cannot respect trump. I believe that respect does not automatically come with the office. Respect is so ...

https://okobserver.org/imagine-that-2/
04/25/2020
Imagine That | The Oklahoma Observer

https://okobserver.org/imagine-that-2/

Imagine That By Oklahoma Observer on April 25, 2020 Facebook Comments Facebook Twitter Previous articleTrump’s Demonic Reversals Of The First Earth Day’s Benefits LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Oklahoma Observer Ads Spring Creek Baptist Church Oklahoma Observer - October 7, ...

Dumb, disgraceful Donald Trump still sneers at the oncoming climate catastrophe, calling it a hoax. His arrogant ignoran...
04/22/2020
Trump’s Demonic Reversals Of The First Earth Day's Benefits | The Oklahoma Observer

Dumb, disgraceful Donald Trump still sneers at the oncoming climate catastrophe, calling it a hoax. His arrogant ignorance is scuttling federal programs and scientific research on climate, destroying restrictions on greenhouse gases produced by the fossil fuel giants, and inviting them to further exploit federal wilderness lands and offshore areas. See Ralph Nader's Earth Day column:

https://okobserver.org/trumps-demonic-reversals-of-the-first-earth-days-benefits/

Earth Day, April 22, 1970, was the most consequential demonstration of civic energy in modern American history. Engaging nearly 20 million Americans participating in about 13,000 local events, this first Earth Day changed corporate and government policies through popular demands for clean air, w ...

We need to speed the transition to the solar panels and wind turbines that engineers have worked so mightily to improve ...
04/22/2020
This Earth Day, Stop The Money Pipeline | The Oklahoma Observer

We need to speed the transition to the solar panels and wind turbines that engineers have worked so mightily to improve and are now the cheapest way to generate power. The only thing standing in the way is the political power of the fossil fuel companies, on clear display as President Trump does everything in his power to preserve their dominance. That’s hard to overcome. Hard but simple. See Bill McKibben's Covering Climate Now essay:

https://okobserver.org/this-earth-day-stop-the-money-pipeline/

BY BILL MCKIBBEN Nineteen-seventy was a simpler time. [February was a simpler time too, but for a moment let’s think outside the pandemic bubble.] Simpler because our environmental troubles could be easily seen. The air above our cities was filthy, and the water in our lakes and streams was gros ....

The era of dirty energy is ending. Even the conservative CBNC analyst Jim Cramer has warned investors that oil stocks ar...
04/22/2020
Green Stimulus Can Tackle Both Climate, Covid Crises | The Oklahoma Observer

The era of dirty energy is ending. Even the conservative CBNC analyst Jim Cramer has warned investors that oil stocks are no longer safe investments, as society is increasingly repudiating fossil fuels. In countries like Germany and South Korea, a green stimulus-based recovery is becoming the consensus choice, with investments in efficiency and clean energy seen as obvious drivers of economic reconstruction. Here in the U.S., green stimulus is easily the best way to create good jobs through public investment. See Daniel Aldana Cohen's and Daniel Kammen's Covering Climate Now essay:

https://okobserver.org/green-stimulus-can-tackle-both-climate-covid-crises/

BY DANIEL ALDANA COHEN AND DANIEL KAMMEN The COVID-19 epidemic is ravaging our tattered healthcare system and shredding our economy. In the past month, over 22 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits, compounding the fear that unemployment could breach 32% absent massive public action. ...

Older Americans are the high-risk demographic for deadly cases of COVID-19. Thus, a call to “return to normalcy” accepts...
04/22/2020
Planned Obsolescence Now Extends To People | The Oklahoma Observer

Older Americans are the high-risk demographic for deadly cases of COVID-19. Thus, a call to “return to normalcy” accepts the notion that the deaths of the elderly – and those with health issues and minority populations with substandard health care options – are just a corollary of planned obsolescence. It’s their time to exit. We need to get these people out of the way so the survivors can get back to work. Their warranty has expired. See Gary Edmondson's latest essay:

https://okobserver.org/planned-obsolescence-now-extends-to-people/

It was an argument I never won. My dad, who grew up during the Great Depression, would greet me with a project, some item that had broken. He would want me to get it repaired. He truly could not comprehend that “nobody fixes things anymore,” that most repair shops had long since closed. Having g...

Oklahoma is at a pivotal moment. A global pandemic has claimed the lives of 143 Sooners in little more than a month. Oil...
04/21/2020
Observercast Episode 11: Medicaid Meets The Ballot Box | The Oklahoma Observer

Oklahoma is at a pivotal moment. A global pandemic has claimed the lives of 143 Sooners in little more than a month. Oil prices plunged into negative territory for the first time in history, meaning it costs more to store oil right now than to refine it. And, oh yeah, it’s an election year – balloting that not only includes the presidency, Congress and statehouse, but also a consequential Oklahoma ballot initiative that could extend health care to 250,000 working poor in the midst of the coronavirus threat.

In this week’s Observercast – Episode 11: Medicaid Meets The Ballot Box – we take a deep dive into this early 21st Century cataclysm, hoping to make sense of it so we can come out the other side in the best shape possible.

Our guests are Amber England, who’s directing the Yes on 802 Medicaid expansion campaign, and Nicole McAfee, the ACLU of Oklahoma’s director of policy and advocacy. They take us inside the vortex of a public health emergency and economic crisis that threatens not only lives, but also the state’s already frayed social safety net and the ability of all Oklahomans to safely vote in what may well be the most critical series of elections in generations.

https://okobserver.org/observercast-episode-11-medicaid-meets-the-ballot-box/

Oklahoma is at a pivotal moment. A global pandemic has claimed the lives of 143 Sooners in little more than a month. Oil prices plunged into negative territory for the first time in history, meaning it costs more to store oil right now than to refine it. And, oh yeah, it’s an election year – bal...

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Our Mission

For 52 years, The Oklahoma Observer has served as the state’s only journal of free voices, providing news, analysis, and commentary that can’t be found in Oklahoma’s uniformly conservative mainstream media. Our motto: To comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.

Focusing primarily on political and social issues within our government and society, we aim to shine a light on rank hypocrisy and public corruption. Our hard hitting pieces on public education reform, health and welfare, civil liberties and separation of church and state have lead to some referring to us as “the conscience of Oklahoma.”

We speak truth to power, no matter who’s in charge: During Governor Henry Bellmon’s era, we were considered too Republican. During Governor Mary Fallin’s recently-completed term, we were attacked as too Democratic. At times, they’ve thrown darts at us at both political headquarters.

When Father John Joyce launched The Oklahoma Observer more than a half century ago, it was financed primarily through a subsidy from the Catholic Archdiocesan Council. But, church leaders yanked their support because of Father Joyce’s vigorous opposition to the Vietnam War.

Rather than accept The Observer’s demise, Father Joyce offered to sell it to the Frosty Troy, the Tulsa Tribune’s state Capitol correspondent. Frosty and his wife, Helen, agreed to the acquisition, beginning the paper’s transformation into Oklahoma’s premier independent journal of commentary.

For 36 years, Helen served as publisher and Frosty as editor, an unbeatable combination that produced an impressive list of state and national awards. In September 2006, Frosty and Helen partnered with Arnold and Beverly Hamilton to transition The Observer into the state’s second century. Helen retired in January 2007, and died later that year; Frosty retired in early 2013 and died Jan. 19, 2017.

The Hamiltons have deep Oklahoma roots: Both are third-generation Okies, raised in Midwest City. They returned to the state for good three decades ago, after living in California and Texas. Before becoming Observer publisher, Beverly spent nearly six years as a financial secretary at Edmond Santa Fe High School. Arnold was the Dallas Morning News’ Oklahoma Bureau chief for nearly two decades. He also covered government and politics for the San Jose Mercury News, the Dallas Times Herald, the Tulsa Tribune and the Oklahoma Journal.

The Observer is published monthly. You can access The Oklahoma Observer online at our website: okobserver.org

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The Observer is a must read for all Oklahomans wanting to understand why Oklahoma is where it is. Executive leadership and the quality of the Legislature matter as well as an informed electorate. This monthly publication - for print or digital - is $50 and definitely informs.
Thanks Arnold Hamilton, for helping spread the good about the Vote Common Good National Tour Stop March 6 at 6 p.m. at the Iglesia Building in OKC.
This week's episode of the Youtube show 'Across the desk' is available for viewing. This week Kit talks about 3 of the bills that are to be introduced in the upcoming 2020 Oklahoma Legislative Session.
New episode is available on my Youtube channel 'Across the Desk' .. This week it's S1:E7(State Question 804 and the Gerrymander)
A trailer for Next week's Youtube show 'Across the Desk w/ Kit Fairchild'... Next week Kit talks about State Question 804 and the political theater behind who's for and who's against the ballot initiative. (New episodes weekly on Sundays and several to binge watch.. Subscribe to the channel!!) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn6o1xgz-BkTs06qJYvS6ng/
This video from Thursday is why Trump is attacking Rep. Elijah Cummings. Let’s not let him get away with it. Share it. Let other people see exactly what it was that Cummings said that so outraged Trump. We can’t avert our eyes.
An article I wrote about Pete Buttigieg My Generation There has always been bloodshed on American soil. From the Civil War of the 1860s to the race wars of the 1960s. But my generation, the generation born in the 1980s, has seen our own brand of turmoil. We learned to associate the words Columbine, Sandy Hook, and Oklahoma City with innocent children dying. The first two? School shootings everyone born later in this generation are so familiar with. The latter, a heartless act of terrorism that took 168 people’s lives, 19 of which were children just being dropped off at daycare. In 2001 our teachers turned on the news to show us two tall buildings, one of which was on fire. The news anchor said an airplane hit the World Trade Center; three words most of us had never heard in the same sentence. How could a pilot make a mistake that big? Was he drunk? Did the autopilot take over terminator-style? Not long after the first plane hit, we got our answer. The cameras caught a second airplane very deliberately hitting the second tower, leaving us in silence. In real-time we watched the towers that would define the rest of our lives burn, collapse, and disappear in a cloud of smoke and fire. Many of our fathers, brothers, and friends did not come back from wars overseas. They died in Vietnam, Korea, Europe, and the Pacific. But for them, the enemy was ‘over there’, away from our schools, cities, churches, and airports. The ones lucky enough to come home didn’t worry about their flight to visit family in Kansas being turned into a missile, or the person next to them having explosives packed in their shoes or underwear. For the most part, prior generations didn’t have to worry about their kids at school; school was safe, just like church and flying. But all of that is different now. If we didn’t hear the screams firsthand, we heard the accounts given by crying children as they relived their trauma on national television. Our safe places have been picked apart one by one, from shopping malls, to running marathons, to country music festivals. We all know, or know of, someone that would not talk about their experiences on the battlefield overseas because it was too traumatizing to relive. Yet we have returned to school, knowing it could be the next warzone. And people wonder why my generation gets a bad rap for being overly anxious. Previous generations have paid unimaginable costs in life and limb on foreign battlefields, and I for one, am grateful the draft does not hang over my head. But just because we weren’t forced to serve, doesn’t mean we haven’t. The military is filled with men and women of my age, and much younger. As of this writing, there are young warriors serving in the deserts of Afghanistan and Iraq who never saw the twin towers standing. In our world, the days when the enemy were so easily defined as being ‘over there’, and we ‘over here’, have almost become relics of the past—casting us in a shadow of uncertainty. We grew up in a world that told us a college education would get us a good job; only to find ourselves being crushed under an education debt that has shackled us to a location where our degree is worth no more than the paper it was printed on. There is an illusion that our generation is earning bigger paychecks than our parents. While the numbers might be higher, we have only seen our purchasing power decline since we were born. Even with the advent of low-interest mortgages, first-time home buyers tax credits, and some products becoming cheaper by being manufactured in China our ability to live the American dream has almost disappeared. Has this caused some of us to give up and hope our parents can support us for as long as they can afford to? Absolutely. But many of us are giving everything we have into a system that is rigged against us. We know our children are going to be crushed with even more debt and inflated prices than us, so we don’t save for retirement. And even though our lifespans have increased, so have our rates of cancer, asthma, and auto-immune disorders. While, at the same time, medical care and prescription costs have sky-rocketed; leaving millennial families to choose between taking the job they really want or staying at a sub-par job because they cannot afford to pay 90 days of COBRA insurance payments to keep their little girl with Chrohn’s disease, their wife with rheumatoid arthritis, or their son with diabetes healthy while they transition jobs. Our bodies are taking on the stressors of air and water filled with pollutants that will never break down. Our houses are being destroyed by floods, fires, and winds unlike anything generations past have witnessed. We are accused of wanting the government to do everything for us. We are accused of being socialists, communists, and lazy. But that is a lie. We would just like to have a piece of the pie the generations before us had. At one time companies cared for the livelihood of their workers even through retirement. Modern employers are hoarding their money, outsourcing our jobs, replacing us with robots, making our education meaningless, and giving us part-time jobs with no benefits, while our government does nothing to protect us. Long-term employment has become an expense to companies. They prefer turnover to paying seniority incentives, and many eventually leave the country altogether. Through the greed of people who will not live to see the future they have created for us, we are the first generation that stands to make less than our parents. Credit has been called the act of paying the now at the expense of the future, and that is exactly what greed and corruption is doing to us. Corrupt companies, lobbyists, and elected representatives are making a fortune at the expense of our future. The misconception that we hate the wealthy is simply not true. We do not hate the wealthy, we want to be wealthy. We do not want the government to do everything for us, we want the government to protect us. We do not want someone to do all the work for us, we want the opportunity to have a dignified job. We do not want the past! We want a future that is bright, clean, and prosperous. We cannot roll back the clock as some have promised. The word ‘again’ does not bring us any hope. We want to hear the words healthy, wealthy, and free. We are not free if our student debt costs more than our parents’ entire existence. We are not free if we can buy a gun but are unable to keep our children safe. We are not free if a genetic disease cripples our finances and the bank forecloses on our home. We are not free if all our jobs are replaced by automation and the only option left to us is to start a whole new career without any of the benefits we worked so hard to earn from companies that dumped us without warning. Lastly, we are not free if our government can undo every social safety net our forefathers fore-fathers put in place for us. Up until now, we have been too young to lead a country. By law, no one under the age of 35 can be president. But one of us in particular is 37. He is the son of an immigrant, and a Navy Reserve Veteran who served his country in Afghanistan, while simultaneously serving his second term as the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, a city with a population over 100,000 residents. His name is Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Don’t worry too much about the last name, because he doesn’t. Some say it is BOOT-a-JUDGE, while others prefer BOOT-EDGE-EDGE. “Say it three time real fast,” he’ll tell you, “and you’ll get to the same place.” He is tall and slim, with striking blue eyes and dark brown hair with the slightest hints of grey. The first thing you will notice (other than his age) is how calm and collected he is. I have watched every video I could find on the internet and TV and never once have I seen him be argumentative or raise his voice. He doesn’t need to beg for your attention, he already has it. He doesn’t need to deflect your questions, he has the answers. And he doesn’t need to attack anyone to show you he is there. He is part of a new generation of leaders who are like nothing we have had before. He rejects the false paradigm our representatives have designed for us. Real people want government to work for them more than they want to be part of a specific party. “Potholes and sewers don’t have R’s or D’s next to them.” If elected president, he would be the first mayor ever to sit behind the resolute desk. He will bring his values to the office: “Caring for the sick and prisoner.” Whether you are an Episcopalian like him—or something else entirely—it cannot be denied we will all, at one time or another, have a time of need. We need a president who empathizes with the common man, because he is a common man with a few pluses. He is a Harvard graduate and a Rhoads Scholar. He knows seven languages, one of which is Norwegian—he learned that just so he could read more books by his favorite author that weren’t translated into English. He has a calming presence with a self-deprecating sense of humor that shows his true colors. I believe those colors are red, white, and blue, and I hope you will, too. www.peteforamerica.com *This is an independent article written by Blake Spurgin and is not endorsed by or otherwise affiliated with Pete Buttigieg or his exploratory committee. @BlakeSpurgin [email protected] #BootEdgeEdge #Pete2020 #PeteButtigieg #PetePals #OKDemocrats